Growing Bay Leaf Tree

Growing Culinary Bay Trees – Laura Nobilis

Fresh Bay leaves are tastier than dried bay leaves. Once you try a fresh sweet bay leaf, Laura Nobilis, in your cooking, you’ll think the dried bay leaves taste like an old oak leaf. – Cooking with fresh bay is healthy and fun. Bay leaf aromas are in the yard and house when fresh bay trees are grown and harvested. Filmed at HerbFest, the largest and longest running herb sale in the U.S. benefitting The Graham Johnson Cultural Arts Endowment, http://www.gjcae.org.

11 Comments

  1. Berto Sierra

    Congratulations for your video.

    Reply
  2. SunnyDaayz

    Interesting! I am going to be planting some of my own herbs this year, and I am definitely going to add the Bay tree. Sounds like a winner. Thanks for the good advice.

    Reply
  3. Shimonetadaisuki

    This is a great, very informative video.
    Thank you very much for posting it.

    I do have a few questions however…
    On the matter of the bay tree not living longer than five years in a pot, is the final conclusion that the keeper of the tree is neglecting it? Is there another underlying problem with keeping the bay laurel in a pot (other than its occasional nutritional intake)?

    Reply
  4. AAnneC

    I live in easter PA. Is this an area in which I can plant/grow a bay tree? What kind of climate do they like?

    Reply
  5. Argot May

    There is an historical bay tree in Eugene, Oregon.

    This guy tempted me to grow one….

    Reply
  6. Bob Johnson

    – make sure variety is “Laura nobilis” as all states have bay trees but only one variety edible.

    Reply
  7. Bob Johnson

    you can grow as long as protect agains wind in winter. Your climate generally slightly too cold but protected it will make it.

    Reply
  8. Bob Johnson

    @Shimonetadaisuki – problem is as you state, grower, not tree. Tree/bush will live for decades so the living condition growers use is issue. Generally will get some type “mite” disease and kills them. 6-9 foot bay topiaries with single or dual balls sell for over $800 ( U.S.) and reason is love and care to get them those shapes and difficulties of growing in containers.

    Reply
  9. MedFaxx

    Hi Joseph, we are in N.C. but bay can survive in your climate depending on how you care for it. Most people in your area put them in containers and move inside during cold winter. Go to our website, herbfest.net, for more information and type in “bay” on search. Thanks.

    Reply
  10. Mars Mars

    Helpful. We have had a container bay tree inside for about 4 years and it’s well over 5 feet tall now. We have really become quite attached to it, so my daughter, at age 4, named it “Mario.” I bought Mario a sibling last year which has already grown about 8 inches. They are actually very easy herbs to grow. She hasn’t named it yet : )

    Reply
  11. Mars Mars

    Update. She just named it “Wengall.” Go figure!

    Reply

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